I’ve heard it all before….“My product is bought seasonally.” “It’s an impulse decision.” “Reach is the most important metric.”

These are the cries of CPG (Consumer Packaged Goods) companies. Whilst there is an element of truth, it doesn’t mean that these brands can simply ignore digital.

Keeping consumers engaged with your brand ensures that it remains front of mind when those consumers are in a store, about to make an ‘impulse’ purchase. But how can we do this? It’s no longer good enough to tell people your product is better than the others, instead, you need to demonstrate how it adds value to their lives. One of the best ways to do that is by creating relatable and engaging content.

To say content marketing is important for all brands right now is a massive understatement. To put this into perspective, in a single day there are 3.5 billion searches on Google and 5 billion videos streamed on YouTube. It is estimated that more than 380 million people using adblockers worldwide, so reaching consumers with engaging content is more important than ever before.

The obvious leader in this space is Red Bull, but to compare yourself to a brand who has spent more than a decade positioning themselves as a media provider more than a producer of energy drinks is to ignore the opportunity. What I’m suggesting here is careful consideration about how to use social listening, meticulous planning and clever curation opportunities to engage with your consumers in new, trustworthy and relevant ways.

Here are four fundamental principles for an FMCG brands wanting to move to a content-led strategy

1. Give them what they want

Let’s not create content for the sake of creating content. Consider the 300+ hours of video being uploaded to YouTube every minute. How do you ensure your content is well thought-out and based on what your consumers care about? The answer to his question is Data!

A brilliant FMCG example is Unilever with All Things Hair. By tracking, in real-time, what consumers are searching for in regards to haircare, Unilever have immediate insights to the types of content they know will resonate with their audience. With the average video receiving upwards of a quarter of a million views, it’s a great example of developing content that is tailored to the audience, and it’s far less complicated than you might imagine.

all things hair

All Things Hair YouTube channel

Free tools such as Google Trends, Facebook Audience Insights and Social Mention are super useful and let you explore what consumers are saying about your brand or your category.

If it’s your first time using tools like this for insights, then a good place to start is by asking the following questions:

  • What are my consumers searching for?
  • What platform are they searching on?
  • What are they talking about?
  • Is the sentiment positive or negative?
  • Which platform is the conversation happening on?
  • Are there clear spikes in search volume around specific times of the year?

Another brilliant example is Nestle Toll House, who specialise in baking products. Realising that bakers were slowly being aged out of the category, they needed to find a new way to engage them whilst retaining their core values. By partnering with Ashley Adams, an established food blogger, they created the ‘Bake My Day’ series, sharing tips and tricks for the modern cook.

By carefully using paid media to promote the channel, they amassed over 17 million views in less than a…