Charlottesville
Battle lines form between white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the ‘alt-right’, and anti-fascist counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12, 2017.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The scenes in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday were painful to watch. Americans fighting Americans with flags, clubs, tear gas, and fists.

The violent face-off between white nationalists and neo-Nazis and counter-protesters resulted in the death of one young woman who was mowed down with a car and two police officers who were monitoring the rallies when their helicopter crashed.

It seemed to be the culmination of the divisiveness that’s shaken this country since November 9, 2016, the ugliest election in recent memory.

But on Sunday, a chorus of voices rose to denounce the violence, and the hatred, and the bigotry, calling for us to come together.

After President Donald Trump took office, Business Insider wanted to find what unites us. We spent six months tracking down issues Americans actually agree on in a series we called Undividing America. Here’s what we learned:

First, we took a hard look at the divisions we are living in. We found some high schools are “resegregating”, splitting black and white, high- and low-income students back into separate schools based on where they live.

See the full story from Graham Flanagan here »

The loss of manufacturing jobs was one of the driving issues of the 2016 election, with Trump promising to bring them back from overseas. This downward spiral has hurt American men, and is even linked with them marrying less and dying sooner. But what’s scarier is that other jobs have been — and will continue to be — lost because of robots.

The loss of manufacturing jobs was one of the driving issues of the 2016 election, with Trump promising to bring them back from overseas. This downward spiral has hurt American men, and is even linked with them marrying less and dying sooner. But what's scarier is that other jobs have been — and will continue to be — lost because of robots.
As middle-income workers are pushed down the economic ladder — going from relatively higher-wage factory jobs to minimum-wage retail jobs — it’s making it harder for lower-income workers to pull themselves up.

Reuters

See the full story from Elena Holodny here »

For people leaving prison, finding a job is even harder. The incarceration rate in the US is one of the highest in the world. Many “go immediately back to what they know” once they’re out of prison because it’s so difficult to find employment.

For people leaving prison, finding a job is even harder. The incarceration rate in the US is one of the highest in the world. Many

Skye Gould/Business Insider

See the full story from Elena Holodny here »

Plus, convicted felons can’t vote. Experts think allowing the 6.1 million American disenfranchised adults to cast their ballots could change the course of elections.

Plus, convicted felons can't vote. Experts think allowing the 6.1 million American disenfranchised adults to cast their ballots could change the course of elections.
Prisoners work at computers following a graduation ceremony from a coding program administered by Silicon Valley’s business community at San Quentin State Prison in California on April 20, 2015.

Reuters

See the full story from Elena Holodny here »

Many Trump supporters expressed fear that immigrants were taking their jobs. When the mayor of a small town in Vermont attempted to resettle 25 refugee families to revive his shrinking workforce, the vitriol it sparked cost him his job.

Many Trump supporters expressed fear that immigrants were taking their jobs. When the mayor of a small town in Vermont attempted to resettle 25 refugee families to revive his shrinking workforce, the vitriol it sparked cost him his job.
Kindergarten teacher Susan Cody, left, shows newly arrived Syrian refugee Dania Khatib, 5, around a classroom as her mother Mahasen Boshnaq and father Ahmed Khatib watch on Jan. 27, 2017, in Rutland, Vermont.

AP Photo/Lisa Rathke

See the full story from Jeremy Berke here »

Part of the reason we’re so divided comes down to the language we use. Behind the scenes, experts from both parties are busy devising and testing new ways to frame hot-button issues designed to pull voters further into their camps.

Part of the reason we're so divided comes down to the language we use. Behind the scenes, experts from both parties are busy devising and testing new ways to frame hot-button issues designed to pull voters further into their camps.

Skye Gould/Business Insider

See the full story from Mark Abadi here »

When we looked closer, we found that America was often not as divided as it seemed. We found signs of hope. As 28 Business Insider reporters and editors spent five months traveling the country, including stops in Alabama, Iowa, Texas, and Vermont, and talking to over 100 Americans, we found solutions rooted in common ground.

See the full story from Dan Bobkoff here »

When you strip away the charged language, nearly all Americans agree we should protect the environment, and they see real solutions we can enact today to do it. We can do a lot to fight climate change — as long as we don’t call it “climate change.”

When you strip away the charged language, nearly all Americans agree we should protect the environment, and they see real solutions we can enact today to do it. We can do a lot to fight climate change — as long as we don't call it
Secretary of Energy Rick Perry speaks to reporters at Earth Day Texas in Dallas on April 21, 2017.

AP Photo/LM Otero

See the full story from Rebecca Harrington here »

Americans also surprisingly agree that rich people and corporations aren’t paying their fair share of taxes, that immigrants make our country stronger, that the federal government should make sure people have health insurance, and that we must uphold fundamental democratic values.

Americans also surprisingly agree that rich people and corporations aren't paying their fair share of taxes, that immigrants make our country stronger, that the federal government should make sure people have health insurance, and that we must uphold fundamental democratic values.

Business Insider/Skye Gould

See the full story from Andy Kiersz and Skye Gould here »

While they are becoming more divided on abortion, most Americans think that federal funding should help protect the environment, that the government spends too little on education and infrastructure, and that same-sex and interracial couples should be legally allowed to wed.

While they are becoming more divided on abortion, most Americans think that federal funding should help protect the environment, that the government spends too little on education and infrastructure, and that same-sex and interracial couples should be legally allowed to wed.

Business Insider/Skye Gould

See the full story from Andy Kiersz and Skye Gould here »

Emotions are still raw — 16% of Americans said they stopped talking to a family member or friend because of the election. We found one mother and daughter who hadn’t spoken to each other since, and captured their first conversation. Three months later, they’re still talking.

See the full story from Graham Flanagan here »

Source: Reuters/Ipsos

The US military has become more isolated from civilian life than at any period…

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