Flywheel Facebook/Flywheel
Flywheel’s at-home fitness bike. Facebook/Flywheel
  • Peloton has filed a lawsuit against one of its biggest competitors, Flywheel, accusing it of creating a copycat version of Peloton’s proprietary home fitness bike.
  • Flywheel has historically offered studio-based cycling workouts. In November 2017, it launched its FLY Anywhere bike, which is designed to be used at home.
  • A spokesman for Flywheel told The Wall Street Journal that it denies any allegations of patent infringement and that the lawsuit is “a classic example of a big business trying to intimidate a competitor out of the marketplace.”

Competition is heating up in the fitness world as two of the biggest names in indoor cycling go head-to-head in a new lawsuit.

On Wednesday, Peloton, the high-tech fitness company that is known for its popular home-fitness bike, filed a lawsuit against one of its biggest competitors, Flywheel, accusing it of creating a copycat version of Peloton’s proprietary bike.

Peloton claims that Flywheel’s FLY Anywhere bike uses Peloton’s technology to stream live and on-demand classes, track the rider’s performance, and compare it to other riders.

Flywheel, which launched in New York in 2010, has historically only offered studio-based cycling workouts. This changed with the launch of its home fitness bike, FLY Anywhere, in November 2017. The bike is designed to bring the studio experience into customer’s homes. A spokesperson for the company told The Wall Street Journal that its bikes have always been outfitted with proprietary technology that tracks and compares rider performance.

The bike starts at $1,699 and functions in a similar way to Peloton’s in that it allows users to stream on-demand and live classes from their home. Customers have the option to stream these classes from their…