Friday’s announcement that e-commerce giant Amazon would buy the Whole Foods grocery chain had major implications for grocery delivery startup Instacart, which has pitched itself for years as a way for brick-and-mortar retailers to resist competition from Amazon. It seemed unlikely that Instacart would hold on to its agreement to deliver for Whole Foods, soon to be owned by its goliath rival.

Such a fate would be both a symbolic and material blow for Instacart since Whole Foods was its first national grocery partner in 2014. The two companies have worked closely together. Whole Foods even installed features in some stores intended to make Instacart shoppers’ work faster and easier.

But a person close to Instacart told Bloomberg that the startup thinks it can still hang on…