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Minnesotans woke up on July 2, rolled over and made their first liquor purchases ever from a store.

At precisely 11 a.m., the state ended its more than century-old ban on Sunday liquor sales, just in time for Independence Day. In doing so, it joined 38 other states and the District of Columbia who now allow some form of Sunday retail alcohol sales, according to the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS).

The change was met with mostly acceptance by liquor store owners and customers across the Twin Cities.

“It feels as if a freedom has been lifted, and now has been enabled further,” said Fred Kreidier, 25, who was among the first in line and about to buy a keg of beer at Zipps Liquors off of E. Franklin Avenue in Minneapolis.

Lillian Yang, co-owner of Snelling Avenue Fine Wines, expressed cautious optimism that the new law will be a boon for business.

“We just wanted to just test it out first, and see how it goes,” Yang said on Saturday. “Some [customers] are really excited about it, because they don’t have to go to the border anymore.”

John Gagnon 50, arrived at 9 a.m. to buy a 12-pack of beer at Zipps Liquors. Gagnon has lived in the Seward neighborhood for most of his life. He said,
John Gagnon 50, arrived at 9 a.m. to buy a 12-pack of beer at Zipps Liquors. Gagnon has lived in the Seward neighborhood for most of his life. He said, ” I am glad that I can buy beer here. Now I don’t have to drive to Wisconsin.” The first-day Sunday sales started at 11 a.m.

The shop’s Google page still shows that it’s closed on Sundays, but Yang said that she will stay open from noon until 6 p.m.

Eager to lure customers, who normally on a Sunday might wander into one of the nearby bars, Yang said she plans to offer a 10 percent discount on all purchases.

The Sunday ban, in effect since statehood in 1858, increasinglyhad been seen as antiquated — crucially by new lawmakers swept into office in a significant turnover at the Legislature. After years of intense lobbying led by such retailers as Total Wine, the law was overturned in…