As Xi Jinping leads China into a new era of personality-driven rule, they’re still making statues of the country’s last Great Helmsman — Mao Zedong.

Effigies of Mao used to take pride of place in almost every village square and college courtyard. While the practice has been in decline since the 1980s, when the Communist Party acted to rein in the personality cult around Mao, statues and busts of the former leader can still be found in party offices, some universities and in farmers’ homes.

There are only about five workers left in the Mao statue workshop at the Jingdezhen Porcelain Factory in China’s northeastern Jiangxi province, but they’re still plying their craft.

The most influential figure in China’s recent history, Mao led the Communists to power and was head of the all-powerful party from 1935 until his death 41 years later. While the famine of the Great Leap Forward and political chaos of the Cultural Revolution tarnished his legacy, Mao is still revered by many in the world’s most populous nation for reunifying China after a century of colonial invasion and internal rebellion.

Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg

Mao’s visage has become an enduring symbol of modern China — his face still appears on the country’s banknotes and looms over Tiananmen Square. He’s often depicted in his trademark “Mao suit” tunic that he and other revolutionary leaders wore to align themselves with the working class. Modern Chinese leaders including Xi still wear a variation on the suit — which was first popularized by revolutionary Sun Yat Sen — at military events.

Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg

Some Mao statues are being retained as historical relics and retirees still place gifts and flowers at their feet on Mao’s birthday every year. As of 2016, there were about 180 public statues of Mao around the country, from more than 2,000 at the peak of the Cultural Revolution, according to the party-run tabloid the Global Times. A stainless steel effigy of Mao erected at Chongqing Medical University in China’s southwest in 2008 was said to be the biggest in the country. It cost almost 5 million yuan ($790,000), the Global Times said.

Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg

Jingdezhen used to be known as China’s “Porcelain Capital” and pottery has been made there for thousands of years. Famous for its blue-and-white china, the city started producing Mao statues during the Cultural Revolution, a period of upheaval in which Mao sought to revive revolutionary zeal and reassert his own centrality.

Photographer: Qilai Shen/Bloomberg

Mao purged potential rivals from positions…