It seems there’s always a new article about Amazon’s latest Alexa news, or a trendy startup trying to disrupt the shopping experience. Or, more soberly, a downtown now dominated by empty storefronts. Americans living and shopping in the country that invented the modern shopping mall, the supermarket, and e-commerce seek out the latest and greatest retail experience. Traditional retailers are now getting into the health business. Amazon bought Whole Foods, a grocer that began as a health food store. Amazon bought PillPack, an online pharmacy startup. Albertsons was set to buy Rite Aid before the deal was canceled. And, in the biggest retail healthcare deal yet, CVS is buying Aetna, bringing together a retail chain with nearly 10,000 stores and a major national health insurer.

What does all this activity mean? Will the average American soon be going to the drugstore to pick up a quart of milk and have someone look at their rash while they’re there? Will my family physician deliver care at the same place that sells my Cheerios? The short answer to both questions: Maybe.

Retail’s entry into healthcare reflects three major trends in how the healthcare industry—and consumer behaviors—are evolving:

Consumers are in the driver’s seat

In 2017, the average single plan deductible for those with employer-sponsored health insurance was $1,505. Since 2006, the average consumer’s annual out-of-pocket healthcare spending has increased by 230 percent. Consumers are spending mostly their own money for basic healthcare services, and they want to see value for that money like they do in other industries. They want reasonable prices, convenient hours and locations, and great service—not exactly attributes for which traditional doctor’s offices or hospitals are known. So, they’re turning to retailers and others to meet…